FCC Part 15 Rules

FCC Part 15 Rules

FCC Part 15 provides the guidelines under which unintentional, intentional, or incidental radiators may be operated without an individual license. The regulations set limitations on the number of electromagnetic interferences that digital and electronic devices can...
FCC Part 15

FCC Part 15

All electronics device manufacturers need to familiarize themselves with the FCC Part 15 and its requirements. Notably, if you are working with any device that operates at 9 kHz or higher, you are working with a Part 15 device regulated by the Federal Communications...
The FCC Approval Process & Regulatory Test Labs

The FCC Approval Process & Regulatory Test Labs

If you plan to sell or manufacture an electronic device in the US, it’s important to secure official approval from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The FCC has a specific set of guidelines regarding electronic goods sold or produced in the United...
What’s the Difference Between EMI and EMC?

What’s the Difference Between EMI and EMC?

When thinking about the testing process for electronic devices, there are two key terms to be familiar with: electromagnetic interference (EMI) and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). There are numerous similarities between these two concepts, but it’s crucial...
What Is the Difference Between FCC and CE?

What Is the Difference Between FCC and CE?

Before you make your electronic device available to the public, you need to ensure that it meets a certain set of standards. These standards have been established by two leading organizations: the Federal Communications Commission in the United States and the European...
How Is EMC Measured?

How Is EMC Measured?

If you aim to manufacture or sell an electronic device in the United States, your product needs to undergo testing to ensure optimal electromagnetic compatibility. The testing process is very extensive to confirm that your device fulfills the FCC’s requirements....